tree: 2f2226ae8273f50479a7fee60c8a1709f7cec9c3 [path history] [tgz]
  1. .externalToolBuilders/
  2. .settings/
  3. Eclipse SWT AWT/
  4. Eclipse SWT Accessibility/
  5. Eclipse SWT Browser/
  6. Eclipse SWT Custom Widgets/
  7. Eclipse SWT Drag and Drop/
  8. Eclipse SWT OLE Win32/
  9. Eclipse SWT OpenGL/
  10. Eclipse SWT PI/
  11. Eclipse SWT Printing/
  12. Eclipse SWT Program/
  13. Eclipse SWT WebKit/
  14. Eclipse SWT/
  15. META-INF/
  16. about_files/
  17. build/
  18. tasks/
  19. .classpath_cocoa
  20. .classpath_gtk
  21. .classpath_gtk_win32
  22. .classpath_win32
  23. .gitignore
  24. .project
  25. Readme.Linux.md
  26. Readme.WebView2.md
  27. Readme.Win32.md
  28. Readme.macOS.md
  29. Readme.md
  30. about.html
  31. build.properties
  32. build.xml
  33. buildFragment.xml
  34. buildInternal.xml
  35. buildSWT.xml
  36. plugin.properties
  37. pom.xml
bundles/org.eclipse.swt/Readme.md

org.eclipse.swt

Main plug-in for the SWT user interface library.

Setting the classpath:

To compile this project, you need to set the classpath specific for your operating and windowing system. For this, rename one of the following files to .classpath:

  • .classpath_win32 - Windows
  • .classpath_cocoa - Mac OS X
  • .classpath_gtk - Linux and all Unix variants

Similar class paths renaming should be done for ./examples/org.eclipse.swt.snippets/

To see these files, you may have to remove the filter for “.* resources”:

  • In the Project Explorer: view menu > Customize View... > Filters
  • In the Package Explorer: view menu > Filters...

Dependencies:

  • SWT Binaries
    You also need to clone the binary Git repository: https://git.eclipse.org/r/#/admin/projects/platform/eclipse.platform.swt.binaries
    and import the project for your platform into your workspace.

    Ensure that the fragment matching your windowingSystem.operatingSystem.cpuArchitecture
    (e.g. org.eclipse.swt.gtk.linux.x86_64) is open in your workspace.
    The fragments provide the platform-specific native libraries.

Using Assertions:

Assertions are added to the code. These don't run in production, but they do when:

  • JUnits are ran, they turn on assertions by default.
  • If you run a java run configuration and add ‘-ea’ to the ‘VM Arguments’

Assertions look like:

assert expression ;
assert expression : msg ;

See: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/technotes/guides/language/assert.html

More Information:

See the Readme.md in the main directory of the Git repository for this project to learn more about SWT development.